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HEIGHT / WEIGHT CHART

Average height and weight of boys at different ages

AGE

WEIGHT (kg)

HEIGHT (cm)

Birth

3.3

50.5

3 months

6.0

61.1

6 months

7.8

67.8

9 months

9.2

72.3

1 year

10.2

76.1

2 years

12.3

85.6

3 years

14.6

94.9

4 years

16.7

102.9

5 years

18.7

109.9

6 years

20.7

116.1

7 years

22.9

121.7

8 years

25.3

127.0

9 years

28.1

132.2

10 years

31.4

137.5

11 years

32.2

140.0

12 years

37.0

147.0

13 years

40.9

153.0

14 years

47.0

160.0

15 years

52.6

166.0

16 years

58.0

171.0

17 years

62.7

175.0

18 years

65.0

177.0

(Source: Nutrient Requirements and Recommended Dietary Allowances for Indians, I.C.M.R. 1990.)

Average height and weight of girls at different ages

AGE

WEIGHT (kg)

HEIGHT (cm)

Birth

3.2

49.9

3 months

5.4

60.2

6 months

7.2

66.6

9 months

8.6

71.1

1 year

9.5

75.0

2 years

11.8

84.5

3 years

14.1

93.9

4 years

16.0

101.6

5 years

17.7

108.4

6 years

19.5

114.6

7 years

21.8

120.6

8 years

24.8

126.4

9 years

28.5

132.2

10 years

32.5

138.3

11 years

33.7

142.0

12 years

38.7

148.0

13 years

44.0

150.0

14 years

48.0

155.0

15 years

51.5

161.0

16 years

53.0

162.0

17 years

54.0

163.0

18 years

54.4

164.0

(Source: Nutrient Requirements and Recommended Dietary Allowances for Indians, I.C.M.R. 1990.)

Height & Weight Pattern in the Growing Baby

Expected weight gain

You need to understand the importance of the role of weight gain, and therefore of your baby's expected or ideal weight. The baby's birth weight is the starting point for growth. Whatever be the birth weight, the growth rate in all the babies is approximately the same. The overall growth pattern depends on the proper food and adequate care of the baby. However illness, starvation, serious neglect or emotional disturbances would make his weight gain dip downwards.

Height or length of the baby matters too

Weight gain is not the only way to assess a baby's growth. Children are not meant to get fatter and fatter, but bigger overall. Getting taller is also included in the growth pattern of the baby. The baby's length will change much more slowly than the weight. Whatever be the baby's length at birth, approximately 2 cm (3/4") will be gained each month or just over 5 cm (2") in 3 months.

Just as there is expected weight gain for a baby of any age, related to the birth weight, so there is a expected length at any age, related to the birth-length. There is a consistent relationship of weight and height in the normal growth pattern of the child.

Exception to normal growth patterns

a.

Pre-term babies : They are very slow to get started on their feeding, and therefore their growing.   The weight tends to remain in low position for a long time

b.

Small - for date babies : They make startling growth during their earlier weeks, but on the whole they tend to occupy still a low position on the normal growth graph

c.

Babies who are ill immediately after birth or in the first weeks :
These babies fail to start gaining weight or may actually loose some.  Excellent care may lead to a spurt of "catch-up growth", so that the baby's personal growth curve shifts upwards towards the normal

d.

Babies who are bottle-fed from birth : These babies may loose no weight in the first days. They may gain very fast in the first days. They may gain very fast from the beginning, which also depends upon the formula food given. An even greater rise occurs in the babies weight when solids are added in addition to the over-concentrated milk. A baby who is gaining weight faster than nature intended, will not gain length to match it. There is a obvious disparity in the height gain compared to the weight.  This cue should make you realise that the baby is starting to get obese rather than simply growing larger